Category

Family Law Blog
Ex Parte Orders
When there is an immediate threat of domestic abuse in Minnesota, the court may grant what is called an ex parte order (aka an emergency order) for protection and grant relief to the threatened individual in a way that the court deems proper. The Minnesota ex parte order provides the following: Restrains the abusing party from committing...
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Restraining-Order
Orders for Protection (OFPs) and Harassment Restraining Orders (HROs) are the legal tools available to individuals to protect themselves from the actions of others. OFPs are used to protect individuals who have been physically harmed or are in fear of bodily harm from another person. OFPs are covered under Minnesota Statute § 518B, the Domestic Abuse...
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Contempt Process
It is the responsibility of the court to control courtroom behavior Contempt of court occurs when an individual shows disrespect for a judge in the courtroom, disobeys a court order, or disrupts judicial proceedings. This results in two types of contempt – criminal contempt and civil contempt. Contempt can occur in the presence of a...
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Divorce Settlement
A divorce settlement is the final terms and conditions of your divorce. It can take a while to get to the point of settlement, especially in a contested divorce case and it is not always agreed upon by both parties. What a divorce settlement does is outline who gets what (how you will split up...
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Under Minnestoa law, when parents are unmarried, the mother has full legal and physical custody rights to their child. A father must go to court to establish a legal right to his child. This does not mean that a father cannot see his child or the parties cannot come to an agreement outside of court for parenting time. What it does...
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In Minnesota there are orders for protection and harassment restraining orders. Although both protect an individual from another who is considered to be a danger, they are very different. An order for protection, or OFP, is a document that is signed by a judge. This document tells an alleged abuser to stop abusing the individual...
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An initial case management conference (ICMC) is the initial meeting with the judge for divorcing couples. By allowing the judge to have early intervention in the process, proper communication can be engaged between the parties so that a resolution can be reached in the case. The judge also gets a feel for the case through...
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You may have been happy with your divorce decree a few years ago when the judge issued it, but circumstances change, making the decree impractical or unworkable for you and your ex-spouse. When this happens, you need to ask the court for a post-decree modification. You will need a knowledgeable Minnesota family law attorney to...
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In some Minnesota courts, family law cases may be assigned to either a judge or a referee.  This is especially the case in the Second Judicial District (Ramsey County) and the Fourth Judicial District (Hennepin County). Although appearing before a referee tends to be similar to appearing before a judge, there are subtle differences that...
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The parties in a Minnesota family law matter are the Petitioner (the party bringing the action) and the Respondent (the party responding to the action). The Respondent has several options for responding to an action.  If the action is for paternity or custody, the Respondent has 20 days to file an answer.  An answer is...
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